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NS-507 Deluxe Digital Water Ionizer $1299

Features:

Five Pt-Ti electroplates for complete water porcess

Color LCD display with operation indication

Powerful 250 Watts transformer 

Self cleaning cycle for water superior water quality

Easy, touch control panel

Produce water pH value up to -10

Produce water with Oxidation Potential of -400mV

 

Water is the most crucial factor in establishing and maintaining proper acid-alkaline balance. Since your body is 70% water, it is extremely important to constantly replenish your supply of it. The body loses 2.5 liters of water every day just through normal bodily functions. The quality of the water that you drink is just as important as the quantity of water you drink. The water you put in your body must be able to prevent toxins and chemical substances from accumulating and creating destructive influences on cells. Water must also transport minerals and nutrients required for cell metabolism, and remove any substances that can damage the cell. Ideally, the water you drink should have a ph between 9 and 10, and you should be drinking 3-4 liters of it daily.

In order to hydrate your body optimally, you need to drink water that is alkaline and ionized. Alkaline water helps to neutralize stored acids and toxins. Once these acids are neutralized, they can then be removed by the body. Alkaline water containing ionic minerals also acts as a conductor of electrochemical activity from cell to cell. Reports from studies suggest that ionized, alkaline water can help the body resist disease and slow aging by:

·        Increasing Intracellular Hydration

·        Replenishing Essential Minerals

·        Stabilizing and Protecting Cells

·        Helping To Maintain Normal Blood Flow and Acid Alkaline Balance

·        Flushing Out and Preventing Wastes from Accumulating in Cells

Preventing Free Radicals from Forming and Damaging Other Cells

What are Antioxidants?

Every day, your body is exposed to free radicals, unstable molecules that can damage the cells in your body in a process often referred to as oxidative stress.

Where do they come from? Everywhere. Not only does your body produce them as part of normal metabolism, there are also many external sources such as air pollution, alcohol, pesticides, sunlight, tobacco smoke, drugs and fried foods. Even our stressful lifestyles are related to excess oxidative stress.

That’s where antioxidants come in. Antioxidants are scavengers that neutralize free radicals. Although your body produces its own antioxidants, they are often insufficient to protect against the total oxidative stress we all experience. In fact, scientists have already linked free radicals to many different types of diseases.

Consuming a diet rich in natural antioxidants, like those that come from fruits and vegetables, may help protect against free radical damage

What are Antioxidants? Benefits of Antioxidants

(HealthCastle.com) Antioxidants are substances or nutrients in our foods which can prevent or slow the oxidative damage to our body. When our body cells use oxygen, they naturally produce free radicals (by-products) which can cause damage. Antioxidants act as "free radical scavengers" and hence prevent and repair damage done by these free radicals.  Health problems such as heart disease, macular degeneration, diabetes, cancer etc are all contributed by oxidative damage. Indeed, a recent study conducted by researchers from London found that 5 servings of fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of stroke by 25 percent. Antioxidants may also enhance immune defense and therefore lower the risk of cancer and infection.

 

How might antioxidants prevent cancer?

Antioxidants neutralize free radicals as the natural by-product of normal cell processes. Free radicals are molecules with incomplete electron shells which make them more chemically reactive than those with complete electron shells. Exposure to various environmental factors, including tobacco smoke and radiation, can also lead to free radical formation. In humans, the most common form of free radicals is oxygen. When an oxygen molecule (O2) becomes electrically charged or “radicalized” it tries to steal electrons from other molecules, causing damage to the DNA and other molecules. Over time, such damage may become irreversible and lead to disease including cancer. Antioxidants are often described as “mopping up” free radicals, meaning they neutralize the electrical charge and prevent the free radical from taking electrons from other molecules.